Out and About in Normandy

Today we decided to escape the noise and intrusion of the workmen in the house.  Further disruption was occurring outside our front gate with the beginning of re-surfacing along our stretch of the road that links Quettehou and St Vaast La Hougue.  We had offered to give our Parisian neighbours a lift to Valognes station as their sejour at no. 125 has come to an end until mid-July.  Afterwards we drove across to the west Cotentin and ambled our way north.  Leafing through a book on Normandy gardens lent to me by Anne I found a possible garden to visit on the Cap de la Hague.

The Garden Jacques Prevert is tucked in the vallee des Moulins, close to St Germain des Vaux.  Gerard Fusberti, a friend of the poet and screenwriter, created the garden in 1981 and it has been open to the public since 1989.  The garden is planted with the poet’s favourite flowers and plants, and Prevert’s wife and friends each planted a tree in his memory.  Their names are painted on boards beneath each specimen.  There are also boards bearing short passages of the poet’s work.  The planting runs along each bank of a stream that tumbles from a small waterfall at the upper extremity of the garden and trickles down to a rustic dwelling, which I think might be the caretaker’s home.  You can walk up one side of the stream and down the other, but there are several small bridges made of red-painted bamboo which allow you to cross and recross as you explore.  There are also informal scrap metal and bamboo sculptures.  It is a simple, tranquil garden with ever the sound of running water.

We walked back to the car and drove along the north west corner of the cape, discovering the lovely Anse St. Martin by Port Racine with a solitary bather half way along the bay.  This is just west of Omonville la Rogue.  We were last there in August 1999 when my sisters and I took our parents and the tribes for a family jamboree to view the solar eclipse.  Out of curiosity we drove onto the complex where we had hired 3 gites to find it significantly expanded, but the games hall and tennis courts were there just as I remembered them.

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